Poole on Numbers, Now Available in a Digital Edition!

Poole’s Synopsis on Numbers is available, not only in print, but also in a digital edition.  It is our largest volume ever (more than 650 pages).

The Book of Numbers contains “the foundation of the Church and Commonwealth of the Israelites, while they walked and wandered in the wilderness”, and lays “before us the unchangeable love of God promised and exhibited to this people; the comely order established and observed among them; sundry examples of His horrible judgments againt obstinate sinners; the Fatherly chastisements and corrections of the faithful offending; and the dangerous plottings and devilish policies of the Church’s enemies”.  –William Attersoll, Numbers (1618)

“I beseech the theological collector not to let a fine copy of good old Matthew Poole’s ‘Synopsis Criticorum’…slip through his fingers without becoming master of it.”  –Dibdin’s ‘Lib. Comp.’, 52.

New Volume: Poole’s Defense of the Deity of the Spirit

At long last, thanks to the work of Michael Seal, the first volume in the “Literary Labors of the Reverend Matthew Poole” series is available.  Blasphemer Slaine with the Sword of the Spirit is Poole’s defense of the Deity of the Holy Spirit, written for the edification of the common man.

From the back cover:  “John Bidle’s “XII Arguments Drawn out of the Scripture; wherein the commonly Received Opinion, Touching the Deity of the Holy Spirit, Is clearly and fully Refuted” (1647) was answered by several Reformed theologians and scholars, both continental and British.  These responses were full, demonstrative, and clear; but they were written largely for academics.  It fell to a young parish minister, Matthew Poole, not yet thirty years of age, to provide a concise and popular response, for the edification of the common man.  Poole’s “Blasphemer Slaine with the Sword of the Spirit” remains one of the best popular defenses of the Deity of the Holy Spirit in the English language.”

The volume is available at http://www.lulu.com/shop/steven-dilday/the-literary-labors-of-the-reverend-matthew-poole-volume-2-blasphemer-slaine-with-the-sword-of-the-spirit/paperback/product-21144058.html.

Soli Deo Gloria.

Supporting the Project

For those interested in seeing a quality, English edition of Poole’s Synopsis in print as quickly as possible, there are several things that you can do to support the project.

1.  If you are finding the translation helpful and edifying, please recommend it to your friends, and “like” it on Facebook.

2.  You can contribute substantially to the final product through editorial work.  If you find typographical or other errors in the text, post your observations so that corrections can be made.  Also, research questions are frequently posted with the translations; if you have any insight, post it.

3.  Please consider making a financial contribution so that the translator, freed from other labors, might spend more time in the translation work.  [See the “Support the Project” button in the right sidebar.]

4.  You can purchase already completed volumes at http://matthewpoole.net/purchase.html.

Onward, for the glory of God, and the edification of Christ’s Church…

Poole on Numbers now Available in Print!

At long last, Poole’s Synopsis on Numbers is complete and available in print, our largest volume ever (more than 650 pages).

The Book of Numbers contains “the foundation of the Church and Commonwealth of the Israelites, while they walked and wandered in the wilderness”, and lays “before us the unchangeable love of God promised and exhibited to this people; the comely order established and observed among them; sundry examples of His horrible judgments againt obstinate sinners; the Fatherly chastisements and corrections of the faithful offending; and the dangerous plottings and devilish policies of the Church’s enemies”.  –William Attersoll, Numbers (1618)

“I beseech the theological collector not to let a fine copy of good old Matthew Poole’s ‘Synopsis Criticorum’…slip through his fingers without becoming master of it.”  –Dibdin’s ‘Lib. Comp.’, 52.